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The Fix

How to fix this problem:

  1. Cut the wire at the fault point
  2. Strip the wire
  3. Crimp on a splice.

Cut The Wire

Electrical_(1).JPG
Simple cut right at the fault point. if it were a bigger section (but not TOO big I would cut the section).

Strip The Wire

Sorry I didn't take a picture of this part but you should have a good idea how to strip the wire. You only heed to remove about 1/4 inch of insulation. The copper underneath should be bright and shiny.

Electrical.JPG
I check to be sure that the splice I will be using fits. Too loose and the crimp will not hold. Too tight and the wire will not fit inside. Here the fit is just right. I will use this connector.

Crimp On A Splice

Electrical_(7).JPG
I place a splice on the crimping tool and have it ready. Place the wire into one open end and crimp real hard. You should not be able to tug the wire out once crimped. For some reason my knuckles resonate with a loud “POP” when I give the first squeeze. The pain that follows shortly thereafter does eventually fade to a dull ache that lasts for days. Does anybody else have this problem???
Electrical_(2).JPG
I double crimp the connection to be sure. You can see that both ends have been crimped twice. This connection should last for years and give no problems in the future (I hope).


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